Dinosaurs of the Cretaceous period of the Mesozoic Era

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Dinosaur Jungle   >   Dinosaur Facts   >   Timeline   >   Cretaceous Period

Cretaceous Period



The Cretaceous period was the final of the three periods into which we divide the Mesozoic Era (the previous periods being the Triassic period, and the Jurassic period), and occured between 144 million and 65 million years ago.

Many well-known types of dinosaurs lived during the Cretaceous, including Ankylosaurus, Iguanodon, Pachycephalosaurus, Protoceratops, Spinosaurus, Styracosaurus, Triceratops, Tyrannosaurus rex, and Velociraptor. It was also during the Cretaceous period that the first flowering plants ("angiosperms") began to appear, including, for example, beech, fig and magnolia.

At the end of the Cretaceous period (known as the K-T boundary), dinosaurs, and and a variety of other animals all suddenly became extinct. There have been many theories proposed for why this mass extinction occured.

The World in the late Cretaceous
Here is a map of the world in the late Cretaceous period. You will notice that the continents have begun to move towards their present positions (movements which continued into the subsequent Tertiary era), with the Atlantic Ocean opening up between Europe and North America, and India continuing its long journey Northwards.

The Cretaceous world was cooler than it had been in the previous Triassic and Jurassic. periods, but still warmer than that of today. At higher latitudes snowfalls became common, although the climate generally remained warm even at such latitudes - glaciation was restricted only to alpine regions in high latitudes. Meanwhile, tropical parts of the globe were much wetter than they had been previously.


Cretaceous Dinosaurs



Here are some of the types of dinosaurs that lived during the Cretaceous period:

Timeline:

 
Achelousaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 83 to 74 million years ago
Achelousaurus 
Achelousaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 83 to 74 million years ago
Acrocanthosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 125 to 100 million years ago
Acrocanthosaurus 
Acrocanthosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 125 to 100 million years ago
Adasaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 74 to 65 million years ago
Adasaurus 
Adasaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 74 to 65 million years ago
Afrovenator was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 136 to 125 million years ago
Afrovenator 
Afrovenator was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 136 to 125 million years ago
 
Agujaceratops was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 83 to 70 million years ago
Agujaceratops 
Agujaceratops was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 83 to 70 million years ago
Alamosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 70 to 65 million years ago
Alamosaurus 
Alamosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 70 to 65 million years ago
Albertosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 76 to 74 million years ago
Albertosaurus 
Albertosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 76 to 74 million years ago
Alectrosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 83 to 74 million years ago
Alectrosaurus 
Alectrosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 83 to 74 million years ago
 
Alioramus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived about 70 million years ago
Alioramus 
Alioramus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived about 70 million years ago
Allosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 154 to 135 million years ago
Allosaurus 
Allosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 154 to 135 million years ago
Altirhinus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 120 to 100 million years ago
Altirhinus 
Altirhinus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 120 to 100 million years ago
Alxasaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 112 to 100 million years ago
Alxasaurus 
Alxasaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 112 to 100 million years ago
 
Ampelosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 71 to 65 million years ago
Ampelosaurus 
Ampelosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 71 to 65 million years ago
Anchiceratops was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 78 to 70 million years ago
Anchiceratops 
Anchiceratops was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 78 to 70 million years ago
Animantarx was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 106 to 97 million years ago
Animantarx 
Animantarx was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 106 to 97 million years ago
Ankylosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 74 to 65 million years ago
Ankylosaurus 
Ankylosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 74 to 65 million years ago
 
Argentinosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived about 100 million years ago
Argentinosaurus 
Argentinosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived about 100 million years ago
Aucasaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 81 to 74 million years ago
Aucasaurus 
Aucasaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 81 to 74 million years ago
Avaceratops was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 80 to 75 million years ago
Avaceratops 
Avaceratops was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 80 to 75 million years ago
Avimimus was an omnivore (ate meat and plants) that lived about 70 million years ago
Avimimus 
Avimimus was an omnivore (ate meat and plants) that lived about 70 million years ago
 
Bactrosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived about 70 million years ago
Bactrosaurus 
Bactrosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived about 70 million years ago
Bambiraptor was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived about 75 million years ago
Bambiraptor 
Bambiraptor was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived about 75 million years ago
Baryonyx was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived about 125 million years ago
Baryonyx 
Baryonyx was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived about 125 million years ago
Brachiosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 156 to 140 million years ago
Brachiosaurus 
Brachiosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 156 to 140 million years ago
 
Buitreraptor was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived about 90 million years ago
Buitreraptor 
Buitreraptor was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived about 90 million years ago
Carcharodontosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 98 to 93 million years ago
Carcharodontosaurus 
Carcharodontosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 98 to 93 million years ago
Carnotaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived about 70 million years ago
Carnotaurus 
Carnotaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived about 70 million years ago
Caudipteryx was an omnivore (ate meat and plants) that lived about 125 million years ago
Caudipteryx 
Caudipteryx was an omnivore (ate meat and plants) that lived about 125 million years ago
 
Centrosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 75 to 70 million years ago
Centrosaurus 
Centrosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 75 to 70 million years ago
Chasmosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 76 to 70 million years ago
Chasmosaurus 
Chasmosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 76 to 70 million years ago
Chirostenotes was an omnivore (ate meat and plants) that lived about 80 million years ago
Chirostenotes 
Chirostenotes was an omnivore (ate meat and plants) that lived about 80 million years ago
Corythosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 80 to 65 million years ago
Corythosaurus 
Corythosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 80 to 65 million years ago
 
Deinonychus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived about 115 million years ago
Deinonychus 
Deinonychus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived about 115 million years ago
Diabloceratops was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived about 85 million years ago
Diabloceratops 
Diabloceratops was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived about 85 million years ago
Dilong was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived about 130 million years ago
Dilong 
Dilong was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived about 130 million years ago
Dromaeosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 76 to 72 million years ago
Dromaeosaurus 
Dromaeosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 76 to 72 million years ago
 
Dromiceiomimus was an omnivore (ate meat and plants) that lived from 80 to 65 million years ago
Dromiceiomimus 
Dromiceiomimus was an omnivore (ate meat and plants) that lived from 80 to 65 million years ago
Echinodon was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived about 140 million years ago
Echinodon 
Echinodon was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived about 140 million years ago
Edmontonia was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 76 to 74 million years ago
Edmontonia 
Edmontonia was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 76 to 74 million years ago
Edmontosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 73 to 65 million years ago
Edmontosaurus 
Edmontosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 73 to 65 million years ago
 
Eotriceratops was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived about 68 million years ago
Eotriceratops 
Eotriceratops was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived about 68 million years ago
Eotyrannus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 125 to 120 million years ago
Eotyrannus 
Eotyrannus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 125 to 120 million years ago
Euoplocephalus (Scolosaurus) was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 70 to 65 million years ago
Euoplocephalus
(Scolosaurus)
Euoplocephalus (Scolosaurus) was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 70 to 65 million years ago
Gallimimus was an omnivore (ate meat and plants) that lived from 75 to 70 million years ago
Gallimimus 
Gallimimus was an omnivore (ate meat and plants) that lived from 75 to 70 million years ago
 
Gastonia was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived about 125 million years ago
Gastonia 
Gastonia was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived about 125 million years ago
Giganotosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 93 to 89 million years ago
Giganotosaurus 
Giganotosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 93 to 89 million years ago
Giraffatitan was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 154 to 142 million years ago
Giraffatitan 
Giraffatitan was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 154 to 142 million years ago
Gorgosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 76 to 68 million years ago
Gorgosaurus 
Gorgosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 76 to 68 million years ago
 
Hadrosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 80 to 75 million years ago
Hadrosaurus 
Hadrosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 80 to 75 million years ago
Hypsilophodon was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 125 to 120 million years ago
Hypsilophodon 
Hypsilophodon was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 125 to 120 million years ago
Iguanodon was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 135 to 125 million years ago
Iguanodon 
Iguanodon was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 135 to 125 million years ago
Kritosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived about 73 million years ago
Kritosaurus 
Kritosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived about 73 million years ago
 
Lambeosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 83 to 65 million years ago
Lambeosaurus 
Lambeosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 83 to 65 million years ago
Magyarosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 71 to 65 million years ago
Magyarosaurus 
Magyarosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 71 to 65 million years ago
Majungasaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 70 to 65 million years ago
Majungasaurus 
Majungasaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 70 to 65 million years ago
Maiasaura was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 80 to 65 million years ago
Maiasaura 
Maiasaura was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 80 to 65 million years ago
 
Microraptor was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived about 120 million years ago
Microraptor 
Microraptor was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived about 120 million years ago
Minmi was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 119 to 113 million years ago
Minmi 
Minmi was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 119 to 113 million years ago
Monoclonius was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 76 to 73 million years ago
Monoclonius 
Monoclonius was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 76 to 73 million years ago
Muttaburrasaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 100 to 98 million years ago
Muttaburrasaurus 
Muttaburrasaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 100 to 98 million years ago
 
Nanyangosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 112 to 100 million years ago
Nanyangosaurus 
Nanyangosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 112 to 100 million years ago
Nemegtosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 72 to 68 million years ago
Nemegtosaurus 
Nemegtosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 72 to 68 million years ago
Nigersaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 119 to 99 million years ago
Nigersaurus 
Nigersaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 119 to 99 million years ago
Nipponosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 89 to 84 million years ago
Nipponosaurus 
Nipponosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 89 to 84 million years ago
 
Nodosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 110 to 100 million years ago
Nodosaurus 
Nodosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 110 to 100 million years ago
Nomingia was an omnivore (ate meat and plants) that lived from 70 to 65 million years ago
Nomingia 
Nomingia was an omnivore (ate meat and plants) that lived from 70 to 65 million years ago
Ornithomimus was an omnivore (ate meat and plants) that lived from 76 to 65 million years ago
Ornithomimus 
Ornithomimus was an omnivore (ate meat and plants) that lived from 76 to 65 million years ago
Oviraptor was an omnivore (ate meat and plants) that lived about 75 million years ago
Oviraptor 
Oviraptor was an omnivore (ate meat and plants) that lived about 75 million years ago
 
Ouranosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 115 to 100 million years ago
Ouranosaurus 
Ouranosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 115 to 100 million years ago
Pachycephalosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 76 to 65 million years ago
Pachycephalosaurus 
Pachycephalosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 76 to 65 million years ago
Pachyrhinosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 72 to 68 million years ago
Pachyrhinosaurus 
Pachyrhinosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 72 to 68 million years ago
Panoplosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 76 to 71 million years ago
Panoplosaurus 
Panoplosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 76 to 71 million years ago
 
Paralititan was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 99 to 94 million years ago
Paralititan 
Paralititan was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 99 to 94 million years ago
Parasaurolophus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 76 to 74 million years ago
Parasaurolophus 
Parasaurolophus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 76 to 74 million years ago
Pelecanimimus was an omnivore (ate meat and plants) that lived from 135 to 125 million years ago
Pelecanimimus 
Pelecanimimus was an omnivore (ate meat and plants) that lived from 135 to 125 million years ago
Pentaceratops was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 75 to 73 million years ago
Pentaceratops 
Pentaceratops was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 75 to 73 million years ago
 
Pinacosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 80 to 75 million years ago
Pinacosaurus 
Pinacosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 80 to 75 million years ago
Prenocephale was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 83 to 65 million years ago
Prenocephale 
Prenocephale was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 83 to 65 million years ago
Protarchaeopteryx was an omnivore (ate meat and plants) that lived about 125 million years ago
Protarchaeopteryx 
Protarchaeopteryx was an omnivore (ate meat and plants) that lived about 125 million years ago
Protoceratops was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 85 to 80 million years ago
Protoceratops 
Protoceratops was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 85 to 80 million years ago
 
Psittacosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 120 to 100 million years ago
Psittacosaurus 
Psittacosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 120 to 100 million years ago
Rajasaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 70 to 65 million years ago
Rajasaurus 
Rajasaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 70 to 65 million years ago
Rugops was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived about 95 million years ago
Rugops 
Rugops was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived about 95 million years ago
Saichania was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived about 80 million years ago
Saichania 
Saichania was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived about 80 million years ago
 
Saltasaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 75 to 65 million years ago
Saltasaurus 
Saltasaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 75 to 65 million years ago
Saurolophus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 74 to 70 million years ago
Saurolophus 
Saurolophus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 74 to 70 million years ago
Scipionyx was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived about 113 million years ago
Scipionyx 
Scipionyx was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived about 113 million years ago
Sinornithoides was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 120 to 100 million years ago
Sinornithoides 
Sinornithoides was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 120 to 100 million years ago
 
Sinosauropteryx was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 125 to 122 million years ago
Sinosauropteryx 
Sinosauropteryx was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 125 to 122 million years ago
Sinovenator was an omnivore (ate meat and plants) that lived from 130 to 125 million years ago
Sinovenator 
Sinovenator was an omnivore (ate meat and plants) that lived from 130 to 125 million years ago
Spinosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 95 to 70 million years ago
Spinosaurus 
Spinosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 95 to 70 million years ago
Stegoceras was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 83 to 65 million years ago
Stegoceras 
Stegoceras was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 83 to 65 million years ago
 
Stegosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 155 to 144 million years ago
Stegosaurus 
Stegosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 155 to 144 million years ago
Struthiomimus was a dinosaur that lived from 76 to 74 million years ago
Struthiomimus 
Struthiomimus was a dinosaur that lived from 76 to 74 million years ago
Styracosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 76 to 70 million years ago
Styracosaurus 
Styracosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 76 to 70 million years ago
Suchomimus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 120 to 110 million years ago
Suchomimus 
Suchomimus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 120 to 110 million years ago
 
Supersaurus (Ultrasauros) was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 154 to 142 million years ago
Supersaurus
(Ultrasauros)
Supersaurus (Ultrasauros) was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 154 to 142 million years ago
Talarurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 98 to 88 million years ago
Talarurus 
Talarurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 98 to 88 million years ago
Tarbosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 68 to 65 million years ago
Tarbosaurus 
Tarbosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 68 to 65 million years ago
Tarchia was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived about 70 million years ago
Tarchia 
Tarchia was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived about 70 million years ago
 
Torosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 70 to 65 million years ago
Torosaurus 
Torosaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 70 to 65 million years ago
Torvosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived about 144 million years ago
Torvosaurus 
Torvosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived about 144 million years ago
Trachodon was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 77 to 73 million years ago
Trachodon 
Trachodon was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 77 to 73 million years ago
Triceratops was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 72 to 65 million years ago
Triceratops 
Triceratops was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 72 to 65 million years ago
 
Troodon was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 74 to 65 million years ago
Troodon 
Troodon was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 74 to 65 million years ago
Tyrannosaurus rex was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 67 to 65 million years ago
Tyrannosaurus rex 
Tyrannosaurus rex was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 67 to 65 million years ago
Ultrasaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 110 to 100 million years ago
Ultrasaurus 
Ultrasaurus was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 110 to 100 million years ago
Utahraptor was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 132 to 119 million years ago
Utahraptor 
Utahraptor was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 132 to 119 million years ago
 
Velociraptor was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 84 to 80 million years ago
Velociraptor 
Velociraptor was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 84 to 80 million years ago
Xiongguanlong was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 125 to 100 million years ago
Xiongguanlong 
Xiongguanlong was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 125 to 100 million years ago
Yangchuanosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 166 to 140 million years ago
Yangchuanosaurus 
Yangchuanosaurus was a carnivore (meat-eater) that lived from 166 to 140 million years ago
Zalmoxes was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived about 69 million years ago
Zalmoxes 
Zalmoxes was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived about 69 million years ago
 
Zuniceratops was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 93 to 89 million years ago
Zuniceratops 
Zuniceratops was a herbivore (plant-eater) that lived from 93 to 89 million years ago
 
 


Related Information & Resources


See Also

Books about the Cretaceous Period


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Cretaceous
By Tadd Galusha

Oni Press
Released: 2019-03-26
Paperback (160 pages)

Cretaceous
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Cretaceous is the research-based, action-packed and heart-wrenching account of a young T-Rex who is separated from its parents and must navigate the dangerous world around it.

When a Tyrannosaurus Rex is separated from its family unit, it embarks on a harrowing journey to reunite with them before the raw, real dangers of the Cretaceous Era separate them for good. This heart-wrenching story takes to the skies and dives into the sea—and explores everywhere in between—in this research-based, fictional account written and illustrated by Tadd Galusha (TMNT/Ghostbusters 2).
Dinosaurs: The Myth-Busting Guide to Prehistoric Beasts (Happy Fox Books) Discover the Science of What Dinosaurs Were Really Like (Not the Movie Versions); In-Depth Articles & Stunning Illustrations
By BBC Focus

Happy Fox Books
Hardcover (96 pages)

Dinosaurs: The Myth-Busting Guide to Prehistoric Beasts (Happy Fox Books) Discover the Science of What Dinosaurs Were Really Like (Not the Movie Versions); In-Depth Articles & Stunning Illustrations
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Discover what dinosaurs were REALLY like in this myth-busting book!

  • In-depth articles and stunning color illustrations
  • How dinosaurs really lived, what they looked like, and how they sounded
  • Go beyond the Hollywood myths for a dramatically different perspective based on the latest scientific research
  • Expert paleontologists provide insight on your favorite dinos and how we learn about them from the fossils they left behind

In this fun and fascinating book, you'll find out how the real dinosaurs lived their lives, what they looked like, how they sounded, and how we know all that!

While popular Hollywood movies have given us a simplistic view of these magnificent creatures, the latest scientific research is changing our assumptions and providing a far different perspective. Rather than being slow, lumbering, and a bit stupid, dinosaurs were smart and nimble-brained—just ask the paleontologists who are peering deep inside the fossilized skulls of these prehistoric animals.

Both kids and adults who are fascinated by dinosaurs will learn how these prehistoric beasts conquered the world, what would have happened if the asteroid hadn't hit Mexico, where the most fossils have been found, what T. rex really looked (and sounded) like, and the modern-day dinosaurs living in your backyard! Experts even weigh in on how we might build our own "Jurassic World" using the latest science.

Loaded with in-depth articles and beautiful color illustrations, including stunning two-page spreads of favorite species, Dinosaurs: The Myth-Busting Guide to Prehistoric Beasts is your ultimate guide to the latest dinosaur research!

Learn all about your favorite dinos:

  • Tyrannosaurus rex
  • Archaeopteryx
  • Triceratops
  • Velociraptor
  • Brachiosaurus
  • Stegosaurus
  • ...and more!

"Packed with facts and illustrations on the latest finds and theories for dinosaur enthusiasts of all ages."
—Mike Fredericks, Editor, Prehistoric Times magazine

Dinosaur Cove: A Cretaceous Survival Guide
By Rex Stone

OUP Oxford
Released: 2013-02-07
Paperback (128 pages)

Dinosaur Cove: A Cretaceous Survival Guide
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Welcome to the Cretaceous!

It's an awesome place but can be dangerous too. So before you set out on your Cretaceous adventure, make sure you have your essential survival guide handy. In here you can find out what a T-Rex eats for lunch (it could be you!), and what you'll need to put in your backpack for your dinosaur adventure. As well as useful and fascinating facts, there are games and puzzles, plus lots of fun activities to try, like creating your own volcano and making some delicious edible dino poo!

If you love the Dinosaur Cove adventures, you're in for a real treat as Jamie and Tom take you into their secret dinosaur world and introduce you to the Cretaceous.
Night Comes to the Cretaceous: Dinosaur Extinction and the Transformation of Modern Geology
By James Lawrence Powell

Brand: W H Freeman
Hardcover (268 pages)

Night Comes to the Cretaceous: Dinosaur Extinction and the Transformation of Modern Geology
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In 1980, the radical theory was proposed that a comet or meteor struck the Earth 65 million years ago, wiping out the dinosaurs and 70 percent of all other species. "Night Comes to the Cretaceous" is the first comprehensive and objective account of how this incredible theory has changed the course of science. 35 illustrations.
Cretaceous Dawn
By Lisa M. Graziano

Graziano, L. M./ Graziano, M. S. A.
Paperback (304 pages)

Cretaceous Dawn
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A long-extinct beetle appears in a physics lab. Four-and-a-half people and a dog are hurled 65 million years through time, to the Age of the Dinosaurs, and paleontologist Julian Whitney and his companions have only one chance for rescue. Meanwhile in the lab, police chief Sharon Earles must solve the mystery of why half a body remains where five people had just been. Physicists try to determine what went wrong but can they fix the vault in time to retrieve the missing people—and do they want to?
The Early Cretaceous Volume 2: Notes, Drawings, and Observations from Prehistory (Ancient Earth Journal)
By Juan Carlos Alonso

Walter Foster Jr. _ Quarto Library
Released: 2017-08-01
Library Binding (48 pages)

The Early Cretaceous Volume 2: Notes, Drawings, and Observations from Prehistory (Ancient Earth Journal)
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What it would be like to see a living, breathing dinosaur? The Early Cretaceous brings readers closer to prehistoric life than ever before. By combining the latest paleontological findings with highly detailed, intimate drawings of wildlife from the Early Cretaceous, readers will look into the eyes of some of the most fascinating creatures to ever inhabit the earth. Written and illustrated in the style of a naturalist's notebook, the viewer will be given a first-hand account of what it is like to stand alongside everything from the first birds to flying dinosaurs to some of the largest creatures ever to walk the earth.

Ancient Earth Journal: The Early Cretaceous: Notes, drawings, and observations from prehistory
By Juan Carlos Alonso

Walter Foster Jr
Hardcover (112 pages)

Ancient Earth Journal: The Early Cretaceous: Notes, drawings, and observations from prehistory
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A 2016 Outstanding Science Trade Book for Students K-12 (National Science Teachers Association-Children's Book Council

The Early Cretaceous brings readers closer to prehistoric life than ever before.

What it would be like to see a living, breathing dinosaur? The Early Cretaceous brings readers closer to prehistoric life than ever before. By combining the latest paleontological findings with highly detailed, intimate drawings of wildlife from the Early Cretaceous, readers will look into the eyes of some of the most fascinating creatures to ever inhabit the earth. Written and illustrated in the style of a naturalist's notebook, the viewer will be given a first-hand account of what it is like to stand alongside everything from the first birds to flying dinosaurs to some of the largest creatures ever to walk the earth. Through detailed illustrations and descriptive narrative, readers will discover how some dinosaurs survived polar blizzards, while others were able to pump blood five stories high to reach their brains. While many books on prehistoric life lump dinosaurs into the general timeline of the Mesozoic Period, no book currently dissects plant and animal life during one specific period. This allows the book to explore wildlife seldom featured in publications, many of them recent discoveries. The Early Cretaceous is backed by the research of one of paleontology's most acclaimed theorists, giving the book the most up to date scientific interpretation regarding animal behaviors, interactions, and recreations.

"The illustrations and artistic layout are exceptionally beautiful. This is a book children will cherish, keep, and remember, and adults will be delighted to add to their collection." - Sylvia Czerkas, Author and Director The Dinosaur Museum, Utah

"The illustrations are fantastic! The Nigersaurus 'grazing' is one of the nicest reconstructions of a rebbachisaurid I've ever seen." - Matthew C. Lamanna, Ph.D., Assistant Curator, Section of Vertebrate Paleontology, Carnegie Museum of Natural History

"Fantastic artwork!" - Andrew Milner, Paleontologist and Curator at St. George Dinosaur Discovery Site

"The art is amazing" - Phil Hore, National Dinosaur Museum, Australia

"I *love* it! The style reminds me of a very cool sci-fi book that I had as a kid (and still have), Dougal Dixon's After Man: A Zoology of the Future. Dixon's book is a wonderful, lavishly illustrated introduction to evolutionary principles that helped set me on the path to becoming a professional paleontologist. I suspect your book is going to be similarly inspirational to many of today's aspiring scientists." - Matthew C. Lamanna, Ph.D., Assistant Curator, Section of Vertebrate Paleontology, Carnegie Museum of Natural History

Rhythms of Insect Evolution: Evidence from the Jurassic and Cretaceous in Northern China
Wiley-Blackwell
Released: 2019-04-29
Hardcover (728 pages)

Rhythms of Insect Evolution: Evidence from the Jurassic and Cretaceous in Northern China
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Documents morphology, taxonomy, phylogeny, evolutionary changes, and interactions of 23 orders of insects from the Middle Jurassic and Early Cretaceous faunas in Northern China

This book showcases 23 different orders of insect fossils from the Mid Mesozoic period (165 to 125 Ma) that were discovered in Northeastern China. It covers not only their taxonomy and morphology, but also their potential implications on natural sciences, such as phylogeny, function, interaction, evolution, and ecology. It covers fossil sites; paleogeology; co-existing animals and plants in well-balanced eco-systems; insects in the spotlight; morphological evolution and functional development; and interactions of insects with co-existing plants, vertebrates, and other insects. The book also includes many elegant and beautiful photographs, line drawings, and 3-D reconstructions of fossilized and extant insects.

Rhythms of Insect Evolution: Evidence from the Jurassic and Cretaceous in Northern China features chapter coverage of such insects as the: Ephemeroptera; Odonata; Blattaria; Isoptera; Orthoptera; Notoptera; Dermaptera; Chresmodidae; Phasmatodea; Plecoptera; Psocoptera; Homoptera; Heteroptera; Megaloptera; Raphidioptera; Neuroptera; Coleoptera; Hymenoptera Diptera; Mecoptera; Siphonaptera; Trichoptera and Lepidoptera.

  • Combines academic natural science, popular science, and artistic presentation to illustrate rhythms of evolution for fossil insects from the Mid Mesozoic of Northern China
  • Documents morphology, taxonomy, phylogeny, and evolutionary changes of 23 orders of insects from the Middle Jurassic and Early Cretaceous faunas in Northern China
  • Presents interactions of insects with plants, vertebrates, and other insects based on well-preserved fossil evidence
  • Uses photos of extant insects and plants, fossil and amber specimens, line drawings, and 3-D computer-generated reconstruction artworks to give readers clear and enjoyable impressions of the scientific findings
  • Introduces insect-related stories from western and Chinese culture in text or sidebars to give global readers broader exposures

Rhythms of Insect Evolution: Evidence from the Jurassic and Cretaceous in Northern China will appeal to entomologists, evolutionists, paleontologists, paleoecologists, and natural scientists. 

The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs: A New History of a Lost World
By Steve Brusatte

William Morrow
Released: 2018-04-24
Hardcover (416 pages)

The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs: A New History of a Lost World
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"THE ULTIMATE DINOSAUR BIOGRAPHY," hails Scientific American: A thrilling new history of the age of dinosaurs, from one of our finest young scientists.

"A masterpiece of science writing." —Washington Post

A New York Times Bestseller • Goodreads Choice Awards Winner • A BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR: Smithsonian, Science Friday, The Times (London), Popular Mechanics, Science News, and more.

"This is scientific storytelling at its most visceral, striding with the beasts through their Triassic dawn, Jurassic dominance, and abrupt demise in the Cretaceous." —Nature

The dinosaurs. Sixty-six million years ago, the Earth’s most fearsome creatures vanished. Today they remain one of our planet’s great mysteries. Now The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs reveals their extraordinary, 200-million-year-long story as never before.

In this captivating narrative (enlivened with more than seventy original illustrations and photographs), Steve Brusatte, a young American paleontologist who has emerged as one of the foremost stars of the field—naming fifteen new species and leading groundbreaking scientific studies and fieldwork—masterfully tells the complete, surprising, and new history of the dinosaurs, drawing on cutting-edge science to dramatically bring to life their lost world and illuminate their enigmatic origins, spectacular flourishing, astonishing diversity, cataclysmic extinction, and startling living legacy. Captivating and revelatory, The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs is a book for the ages.

Brusatte traces the evolution of dinosaurs from their inauspicious start as small shadow dwellers—themselves the beneficiaries of a mass extinction caused by volcanic eruptions at the beginning of the Triassic period—into the dominant array of species every wide-eyed child memorizes today, T. rex, Triceratops, Brontosaurus, and more. This gifted scientist and writer re-creates the dinosaurs’ peak during the Jurassic and Cretaceous, when thousands of species thrived, and winged and feathered dinosaurs, the prehistoric ancestors of modern birds, emerged. The story continues to the end of the Cretaceous period, when a giant asteroid or comet struck the planet and nearly every dinosaur species (but not all) died out, in the most extraordinary extinction event in earth’s history, one full of lessons for today as we confront a “sixth extinction.”

Brusatte also recalls compelling stories from his globe-trotting expeditions during one of the most exciting eras in dinosaur research—which he calls “a new golden age of discovery”—and offers thrilling accounts of some of the remarkable findings he and his colleagues have made, including primitive human-sized tyrannosaurs; monstrous carnivores even larger than T. rex; and paradigm-shifting feathered raptors from China.

An electrifying scientific history that unearths the dinosaurs’ epic saga, The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs will be a definitive and treasured account for decades to come.

Includes 75 images, world maps of the prehistoric earth, and a dinosaur family tree.

Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic History of Latin American Vegetation and Terrestrial Environments (Monographs in Systematic Botany from the Missouri Botanical)
By Alan Graham

Brand: Missouri Botanical Garden Press
Hardcover (618 pages)

Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic History of Latin American Vegetation and Terrestrial Environments (Monographs in Systematic Botany from the Missouri Botanical)
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This volume summarizes the history of Latin American vegetation from just prior to the asteroid impact at Chicxulub, Mexico, at the end of the Cretaceous period through the rapid-paced events of Holocene and Recent times, tracing highlights in the origin of lineages and plant communities that constitute a fundamental part of the tropical ecosystems of the New World. Emphasis is placed on the array of available methods and approaches, as well as on the need for incorporating ancillary information from the many relevant disciplines and for assessing the paleobiological results within the context of independent lines of inquiry—particularly important for understanding the vast and complex communities of Latin America.


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